Body, Self and Family

The Snapping the Stiletto: Essex Women’s History Festival on Saturday 9th March 2019 is being organised in partnership with the Body, Self and Family Project. In this guest post, the BSF project team tell us about their work.

body self family bannerThe Body, Self and Family project at the University of Essex is researching women’s psychological, emotional and bodily health in Britain between the 1960s and 1990s. We want to find out more about the everyday health experiences of women in a period when the pattern of women’s lives changed almost beyond recognition. Across these decades, women entered the workforce in larger numbers, became involved in feminist activism, limited their families, and increasingly chose to marry later (or not at all).  By the end of these decades, women expected to lead very different lives to those of their own mothers and grandmothers.

 

This project asks: How did women experience these sweeping social and cultural changes? What did these shifts mean for women’s own emotional wellbeing, and for their traditional roles as carers? How did women of different ages, social classes, ethnicities and sexual orientations experience these social changes differently? To find answers to these questions, we are interviewing women born between 1940-1970, including 25 women from around Essex. Our talk at the Snapping the Stiletto Festival will present the team’s initial findings for the first time, focusing especially on the experiences of girls growing up in Essex in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Another part of the project is work with community groups, Girl Guides and schools to develop toolkits that draw on historical resources to improve the emotional health and wellbeing of adolescents today. You can get a taste of some of these activities at our two craftivism sessions at the Festival, on ‘Body Image’ and ‘Seeing Red: Periods, Poverty and Protest’.

 

To find out more about the Body, Self and Family Project, see our website

Tracey Loughran

Daisy Payling

Kate Mahoney

Hannah Froom

The Festival is now fully booked but please do join the waiting list if you are still interested in attending. We will offer out any returned tickets as soon as possible.

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Focus on… Southend Museums

Votes for WomenSouthend Museums consists of four unique venues spread across the town:

  • Southend Central Museum and Planetarium
  • Beecroft Art Gallery
  • Southchurch Hall
  • Prittlewell Priory

 

The museum has been working very closely with Snapping the Stiletto volunteers to research women at the start of our hundred year period. In addition to trying to discover the identity of this mystery suffragette, stories being researched include that of Adelaide Hawken, who set up Southend’s first mother and baby clinic and Rosina Sky, a suffrage leader who ran a tobacconist shop in the town who refused to pay her business rates as she couldn’t vote on how they were spent.

 

Click here to find out how to get involved in this and other opportunities across the county.

 

We are particularly keen to highlight our events team, who will be helping to share stories like these at a range of displays and celebratory events over the coming year and a half. Monday 4th June is our first training day for events volunteers, although others will be scheduled soon if you can’t make it (including at least one on a weekend). For more information, click here.

 

Who is The Mystery Suffragette?

Guest post by Iona Farrell, Assistant Curator of Social History at Southend Museums.

At Southend Museums we are uncovering the hidden histories of campaigning Southend women. Through a team of fantastic volunteers we are discovering more about two inspiring women- Rosina Sky and Councillor Adelaide Hawken- who both campaigned for better lives for women within the town.

Rosina Sky fought for the enfranchisement of women alongside being an independent businesswoman whilst Councillor Hawken’s tireless efforts led to the founding of the first mother and baby clinic within the town.

We’ve found images relating to these women and other campaigners in the town but we want your help in finding out more.

Can you help us uncover more stories?

Who is this unknown Suffragette?

 

Votes for Women.jpg

This photograph shows a Suffragette believed to be taken in Southend yet we know little of who this woman is.

Can you help us discover her story? Can you help us give her a voice?

 

The women at the Westcliff Institute

ww1 baby clinic 2These images depict a mother and baby clinic believed to be located at the Westcliff Institute, now the Trinity Family Centre. Following research uncovered by Snapping the Stiletto volunteers this was the site of the clinic founded by Councillor Adelaide Hawken in 1915. It provided much needed support and advice for mothers and aimed to reduce infant mortality rates.

ww1 baby clinic 5

We believe these photographs are of the Clinic, can you help us identify the women and children involved?

Can you help us learn more about these photos and the Westcliff Institute?

We want to hear your stories.

ww1 baby clinic 4

 

If you can help identify any of the women in these photographs or can share stories of the clinic, pleased contact  Southend Museums by emailing ionafarrell@southend.gov.uk

 

Want to become a volunteer?

If you want to help uncover more hidden histories, sign up as a Snapping the Stiletto volunteer