Needles, Threads & Fancy Dress

Snapping the Stiletto has an opportunity to take part in Colchester Carnival this September.

To help us celebrate 100 years of change we’re looking for volunteers to dress as women from each decade of those 100 years (as well as volunteers to make the costumes).

Are you skilled with a sewing machine and able to help? Click here for more information about our costume-making challenge.

Or if you like dressing up and fancy being in the carnival procession on Saturday 14th September, click here to volunteer.

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Focus on… Southend Museums

Votes for WomenSouthend Museums consists of four unique venues spread across the town:

  • Southend Central Museum and Planetarium
  • Beecroft Art Gallery
  • Southchurch Hall
  • Prittlewell Priory

 

The museum has been working very closely with Snapping the Stiletto volunteers to research women at the start of our hundred year period. In addition to trying to discover the identity of this mystery suffragette, stories being researched include that of Adelaide Hawken, who set up Southend’s first mother and baby clinic and Rosina Sky, a suffrage leader who ran a tobacconist shop in the town who refused to pay her business rates as she couldn’t vote on how they were spent.

 

Click here to find out how to get involved in this and other opportunities across the county.

 

We are particularly keen to highlight our events team, who will be helping to share stories like these at a range of displays and celebratory events over the coming year and a half. Monday 4th June is our first training day for events volunteers, although others will be scheduled soon if you can’t make it (including at least one on a weekend). For more information, click here.

 

Why Now?

Amy Cotterill, Museum Development Officer, explains why Snapping the Stiletto is looking back on the past hundred years and examines why the stories we’re uncovering are relevant today.

handmaid

Elizabeth Moss as Offred in The Handmaid’s Tale

Sunday saw the return of The Handmaids Tale to Channel 4. Based on the novel by Margaret Attwood, it depicts a future where American women’s rights have been thoroughly supressed. They are not allowed to read, have jobs or have bank accounts.

 

Over the weekend, I read this interview with Margaret Atwood, discussing how the book is frighteningly relevant today, arguably more so then when it was first published in the 1980s. It made me think about this project, why I instigated it and how much has changed for women (both positively and negatively) in just the last couple of years since I started working on it.

 

Relevance when it was originally written…

Things began back in 2016, when museums across Essex were taking part in a WW1 commemoration project entitled Now the Last Poppy Has Fallen. The project was coming to an end and several museums asked me to support them in running another countywide project. A quick Google search revealed that 2018 marks 100 years since the first UK women got the vote, 90 years since women were able to vote on equal terms with men and 50 years since women employed by Ford at Dagenham went on strike for equal pay. Given the local and national relevance, and the negative stereotype surrounding “Essex Girls”, a project celebrating the women of Essex was an obvious choice for all of us. We wanted to explore how women’s lives have changed during this last century and highlight stories of inspiring individuals to help shift perceptions of what it actually means to be an Essex woman.

 

As I worked with the museums to flesh out the project, the need for a project researching the history of women in the county became very clear. Most museums had very little knowledge of what was in their collection regarding women’s history. For most of the past hundred years, museum collections have been assembled and researched by men, often pursuing their own particular areas of interest. Women’s history has been very much neglected. We knew that the museum collections contained objects that could tell stories of many amazing women, but we lacked the information to know what those stories are.

 

While I was writing our application to the Esmee Fairbairn Collections Fund, the “period tax” and debates around equal pay were very much in the news, and this certainly informed how the project was developed.

Consulting with the museums, we were very clear that this project was about two things.

  1. Improving museum’s own understanding of Essex women’s history over the past hundred years and how that is reflected within their collections
  2. Sharing the stories we uncover with as many people as possible

 

Our definition of an “Essex woman” is very broad and we have always wanted to make sure that the stories include those of women who migrated to Essex from around the world.

It was also clear to us that we reach people who don’t usually visit museums with our project, we need to work with members of the public to help plan and deliver the project. Our Project Manager Pippa Smith has been conducting a lot of consultation to find out what themes to focus our research on and how we can present the information to reach as many people as possible.

 

Relevance now…

I always believed that in showing how much women’s lives have changes, we would highlight how much still needs to change, but I was unprepared for how much the news would be dominated by women’s rights during the last two years. The election of Donald Trump and the protest marches this sparked, #MeToo, Meghan Markle giving up her career as an actress when she got married and the Windrush Scandal at a time when we are trying to promote how much migrant women have done for our county. The gender pay gap and period poverty have not gone away and continue to be issues that need addressing.

 

Today is the Irish Referendum on the Eighth Amendment. Depending on the outcome, women there may gain the rights that Essex women have had since 1967 while in America, Trump’s administration is seeking to cut funding to family planning clinics if they provide “abortion related services”.

 

The research done by our incredible volunteers has uncovered so many parallels to these “modern” themes. The protests of the suffrage movement, women being sacked as teachers because they had married or finding that their pay had been cut when they returned from honeymoon because “their husband would be providing for them”, the first women’s clinics being founded in Essex during and after World War 1…

 

I am already proud of the work this project is doing, but I hope that when it ends in Autumn 2019, we can say that we have not only been relevant, but that we have led to positive changes for local women.

 

If you to be involved in Snapping the Stiletto, we have numerous volunteering opportunities, including helping with events and writing exhibition text. Find out more here. New opportunities are added regularly so do keep checking back.

Focus On… Colchester Museums

colchester-castle

Colchester Borough Council runs three museums in the town, Colchester Castle, which focuses on archaeology, Hollytrees which contains their social history collections and the Natural History Museum, which focuses on the science wildlife habitats, biodiversity and climate change.

 

As part of Snapping the Stiletto, Colchester Museums want to learn more about Mrs Bertha Mason. Bertha, along with her husband and sons, set up the E. N Mason & Sons printing company. Their factory was situated in the Arclight works on Maidenburgh St in Colchester between 1921 and 1938 when it moved to Cowdray Avenue. It made some of Britain’s very first photocopiers amongst other copying technologies.

The museum holds an archive of material relating to the Mason family, including photographs of and letters from/to Bertha. They are looking for a volunteer to help by scanning this material and adding to the information about each piece. The volunteer can also spend a day at the Essex Record Office as there are a variety of documents and oral history recordings in their archive relating to the Mason family and the Arclight printing works.

To volunteer to help with the research, or to find out more, click here. 

 

The museum is also looking for volunteers to share their posts on social media, promoting the museum and the work it does. You can sign up here to help and follow their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts.

Focus On… Redbridge Museum

 

Red Mus - entrance1

Redbridge Museum is within the Central Library in Ilford. While Redbridge is now a London Borough, it was part of Essex until 1965 which is why the museum is taking part in our project.

 

The museum hosts a range of permanent displays and temporary exhibitions, runs an active schools programme and is open Tuesday to Saturday.

Red Mus EdwardianRm low res

There is a varied range of volunteering opportunities available with Redbridge Museum through Snapping the Stiletto. You could research local suffrage campaigners and the museum is offering training in the use of microfiche readers to find these stories hidden in old newspapers.

The museum is also helping Woodford County High School celebrate its centenary in 2019. They want to know what happened to the school’s first female graduates who went on to attended university in the 1920s.

They have several hours of oral history recordings which reveal local women’s stories in their own words that need to be transcribed. This can be done in your own home as the museum will send you a copy of the recording. Topics include moving from the Caribbean, nursing, the NHS, dating, sexism, racism and living in Ilford, Wanstead and Woodford.

Finally, there is also an opportunity to go behind the scenes at the museum and search their archive for information about local women’s groups and societies.

 

All of these and other volunteering opportunities can be found here.

Have Your Say: Training and Events

chappelow4-e1524227097785.jpgWe are planning to run more training sessions and events for project volunteers, covering a range of subjects such as research skills, handling museum objects, writing museum text and conducting oral history interviews. The sessions will take place at venues across Essex.

We want this training to be as accessible as possible, so want your views on when the best time is to run it. Please can you vote on the poll below, to let us know when you’d be available? You can choose as many options as you want.

Unfortunately, we will be dependant on when trainers and venues are available so we can’t guarantee that everything will be split exactly as indicated by the poll, but we will try our best!

 

 

 

 

The poll closes at midday on 8th May.

 

Creative Opportunity: Poet-in-Residence

pexels-photo-891674.jpeg“Snapping the Stiletto” is a two year project by Essex County Council, exploring how Essex women’s lives have changed since 1918. The project has received a £95 445 grant from the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund to work with 11 local museums to explore their collections and discover hidden inspirational stories. The project aims to replace the outdated stereotype of ‘Essex Girls’ by highlighting stories of Strong Essex Women. The key themes that emerged through our community consultation are Campaigning Women, Working Women and Migrant Women.

More details about the project can be found at: www.snappingthestiletto.com

We are looking for a “Poet in Residence” to create 4 poems inspired by objects in the museums’ collections and to lead creative writing workshops for young people and community groups.

At the moment we have funding for two workshops from SHARE Museums East, but we may be able to extend this in the future.

The fee for the project is broken down like this:

  • Four poems – £1200
  • Workshop 1 – £300
  • Workshop 2 – £300
  • Expenses – £200

Total: £2000

The successful candidate will be required to deliver the workshops at yet-to-confirmed locations within Essex and travel costs are included within the project fee. They will also be expected to have Public Liability Insurance with an indemnity limit of £5 million.

To apply, please submit to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk:

  • A 500 – 750 word personal statement describing your previous experience in leading creative workshops, your approach to the project and why you want to be involved in celebrating these Strong Essex Women
  • A portfolio of at least 5 previous poems
  • A CV
  • Details of 2 referees

Deadline: Thursday 22nd March, 23:59pm

For more information, email amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk