Snapping the Stiletto Festival – Can You Help?

HMS Westcliff Cooks - courtesy of Southend Museums

HMS Westcliff Cooks – courtesy of Southend Museums

It’s just under a month until our Women’s History Festival at the University of Essex Business School and we’re really excited. We’ve got a great range of contributors, who’ll we be talking about over the next few weeks, and tickets have been going so fast we’ve shuffled things around so we can add 100 extra seats.

We are currently recruiting volunteers to help us in the run up and on the day. Please can you help by signing up to one (or more) of the “volunteer challenges” below?

Social Media

Can you help spread the word about the festival amongst your friends, family and colleagues? We’re asking people to sign us as social media volunteers, who’ll keep an eye out for our posts on Twitter, Facebook and on our blog and share them on their own accounts. Click here to learn more or sign up.

Stewarding

We want everyone coming to our festival to have a great time, so we need some extra people to help us welcome attendees, show them where the different events are taking place and to assist with the evaluation. Click here if you’d like to help.

Donate

On the day, we’re going to be collecting items on behalf of two important causes. The Red Box Project battles period poverty by distributing sanitary products to young women via schools. Beauty Banks collect beauty and hygiene products and pass them on to those who need them via foodbanks and shelters. Click the links to find out more.

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An exciting year ahead

Happy New year! Last year was an exciting year and you can’t have missed that it was a year when we celebrated 100 years of some women getting the vote. Teams of Snapping the Stiletto volunteers worked with our partner museums throughout the year to uncover stories of Essex women and their achievements over the last 100 years.

 

 

This year we are telling these stories across Essex starting with an exhibition at Epping Forest District Museum opening this Saturday (12th  January) and staying there until March 16th. See our exhibition page for details of where else the exhibition will be over the coming year.

This exhibition contains stories both researched and told by Essex women. They chose the title ‘Essex Women; Adversity, Adventure and Aspiration’. Project volunteers and the Project Team consulted local groups to steer the research and volunteers worked hard with our partners to find these stories. A team of volunteers have written much of the text, chosen images and come up with interactive ideas all designed to celebrate 100 years of change for women.

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Volunteers attending a text writing workshop

Come along and find out what it has been like for women serving in the police and Fire services, working the land during wartime and moving here to support our health services.

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Women Police Officers. Image courtesy of the Essex Police Museum

 

Discover Essex businesswomen and engineers.

Women worker at a machine

A worker at the EKCO factory in Southend. Image courtesy of Southend Museums

 

Grace Chappelow campaigning. Image courtesy of Chelmsford museum

Find out more about Essex women who campaigned for lots of different causes and let us know who is your strong Essex Women!

 

(The exhibition will be on display at Epping Forest District Museum in Waltham Abbey from Saturday 12th January until Saturday 16th March. It will then visit other venues around the county – dates and details can be found here).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More mystery women

We have a great team of volunteers in Southend working with the museum service there and they are looking into the stories of two local women- Rosina Sky and Adelaide Hawken.

Rosina Sky was a suffragette who ran her own business (a tobacconist shop) and was active in the Tax resistance league. We know that she had goods and chattels sold at auction as she had refused to pay tax- ‘No Vote, No Tax’

Rosina Sky protesting ‘No Vote, No tax’ after her goods were seized.

The team at Southend have managed to make contact with some of Rosina’s descendants who have allowed us the use this photograph which shows Rosina (on the right of the photo) along with supporters. Apparently supporters went to the auction and bought many of Rosina’s goods back for her.

Supporters of Rosina Sky.
Thanks to Peggy Ditton the granddaughter of Rosina Sky for allowing us to use this image

Several well-known suffragettes were supporters of the League and of Mrs Sky.  Anne Cobden Sanderson was a founder member of the Tax Resistance League. She had progressive ideas for the time and when she married she and her husband combined their surnames (she was Anne Cobden and he Thomas James Sanderson). Anne was an active and well-known suffragette. She and her husband were also important figures in the Arts and Crafts movement and friends of William Morris. Anne started her political campaigning for the vote as a suffragist believing that change could come about by education and discussion but became frustrated by lack of change and joined the WSPU (Women’s Social and Political Union) – one of the first well known suffragists to move to the more militant protest group.

Anne is reported to have travelled to Southend from London in September 1911 to ‘attend the sale of Rosina’s Sky’s chattels’. She wrote in a letter in 1912 that she wouldn’t be able to visit a woman just imprisoned as she had to go to an afternoon sale in Southend (again of Mrs Sky’s goods) (The Women’s Suffrage Movement- a reference Guide 1886-1928).

We also know that Margaret Kineton Parkes came to support Rosina at one sale along with members of the Southend and Westcliffe Branch of the WSPU. Margaret was the secretary of the Tax Resistance League and her home was also their office near to Covent Garden in London

We’d love to know if Anne Cobden Sanderson or Margaret Kineton Parkes are in the photograph above. We’d also love to identify any of the women in the photograph- many must have been local. One is intriguing us in particular as we wonder if our ‘mystery suffragette’ could be in there?

Could this be the same person?

Can you help? Is an ancestor of yours in there? Do you think our mystery suffragette is one of these women? Please get in touch if you can help!

Some mysteries we need help with

We have been a bit quiet recently as lots of our volunteers are busy researching stories and we are starting to get results back in. There are some really great stories coming in and it is clear that Essex women have been contributing to life in the county in a positive way for a long time!

One of the challenges we are facing is the low visibility of some of these women. We get tantalising glimpses of stories but because womens’ history hasn’t always been recorded and celebrated the project is coming across a number of ‘dead ends’.

We’ll be launching some appeals for help over the next few weeks to see if we can get more information to help us tell these stories.

Mrs Wilson in 1918 Image Courtsey of the Essex Police Museum

One thing that is puzzling me at the moment came from the transcripts a team of volunteers have completed of Alice Wilson’s Notebook from the Essex Police Museum. Alice was a patrol women working in Romford in 1918 and much of her notebook describes her dealing with domestic things such as ‘had a complaint about children knocking in doors in London Road’.

 

Two pages stand out a little and I can’t work out whether there are one or two stories here or whether Alice was being economical with space in her notebook and the two are mixed up!

‘Alice Roberts (Roberto?) will be sent to (Balsal ?) Heath as had a bad injury single Hospital  to X ray’

Where was Alice sent?

‘Police was asked by N.C.O to take notice of any girl wearing WAAC uniform without badge on front. Also badge on armbit. They are (unliked?)’

What does the comment about WAAC uniform mean?

Does anyone have an idea where Alice was sent?

What was the story behind women wearing WAAC uniforms without badges? Why were police asked to look out for them?

Any ideas or further information would be great to have!

Please email pippa.smith@essex.gov.uk or leave a comment below if you can help